#GivingTuesday is TODAY

Today is Giving Tuesday, a day dedicated to giving back. There are two ways that you can give today; your time and your treasure. Please email us at tapestry@irvingbible.org if you would like to bless adoptive and foster families by volunteering your time. We have many opportunities for you to volunteer from support groups to our annual conference.
The other way to give today is with your treasure. You can donate online or you can mail a check to:

Irving Bible Church
Attention: Tapestry
2435 Kinwest Parkway
Irving, Texas 75063

Your giving will allow us to continue to be a place of loving, supportive, and authentic community where we encourage and equip families along their adoption and foster care journey.

So would you consider making a gift to Tapestry today on Giving Tuesday?

Thank you and God bless you,

Ryan


Tapestry is a ministry of Irving Bible Church. All contributions to Tapestry are tax-deductible to the maximum extent permitted by law.

When Two Worlds Collide

When I was a child, I wanted to be an airline pilot. I thought it would be the most romantic way to spend my days floating amongst the clouds. My dad traveled for work when I was a kid and when he came home, he would go down on one knee expecting a hug and I would run up to him expecting the in-flight magazine. I couldn’t yet read, but I would find the page with the pictures of the aircraft and memorize their seating charts. I was probably the only 5-year-old who could tell you the best place to sit on an airplane.

Romantic notions of flight aside, I didn’t become a pilot because I don’t like to fly; it terrifies me. I just can’t get past the fact that I’m strapped, with a lap belt no less, to a chair in an aluminum cylinder with wings and engines 35,000 feet in the air.

I love going new places and always look forward to traveling, but my excitement usually turns into anxiety seconds after I park my car. Two things confront my senses the moment I get out of my car; the smell of jet fuel and the sound of jet engines and as I process those two things I can feel my anxiety spike. It increases again as I enter the terminal and I see the security check line. I’m probably the only person who is actually happy when they see a long, slow moving TSA security check line because that gives me a little break from my now constantly increasing anxiety.

But my freedom from anxiety doesn’t last long because the inevitable always happens and I make my way through the security checkpoint. Clearing security is significant because it’s at that point that I realize that I am going to have to board the aircraft. Arriving at the gate, boarding the plane, and sitting in my seat all cause my anxiety to increase and by the time we push back from the gate my breathing is shallow and fast. I am hot and I can feel perspiration running down my face. I’m bordering on a panic attack.

My wife gives me peace and calming essential oils and I rub it on my wrists and on the back of my neck. And then they turn at the bottom of the runway and that plane accelerates and now I’m holding on for dear life. I’ve got headphones on with loud  music and I’m reading at the same time because I just want to overwhelm my senses. As the plane takes off I can feel all of the gravity that that aircraft is fighting against, I can feel it in my chest and I can’t breathe. That’s how I fly. Some of you can relate.

A few years ago, a man about four rows in front of me choked on a flight. The person next to him quickly hit the flight attendant call button, she came and performed the Heimlich, clearing his airway. We continued on to Nashville without further incident.

When we arrived home, we picked up our kids from my parent’s house and my dad asked me about our trip. I told him about the choking incident. He immediately looked at my mom and asked her if she remembered when I choked on a plane as a small child. She recalled the time when I was two or three years old.

I asked a therapist friend of mine if my fear of flying could be related to the childhood choking incident. She immediately said yes. She explained that even though I didn’t have any explicit memories of the event, I had implicit ones. In other words, my body remembered what my mind couldn’t recall. My body had associated flying with choking, and over the years formed a narrative that bad things happen to me on airplanes. My anxiety was because my body was getting ready for something bad to happen. My body was in survival mode and trying to alert me to the coming danger.

I am happy to report that I can now actually make it onto the plane without any panic attacks. The essential oils don’t need to travel with me anymore, and I can actually take off without having to overwhelm my senses. Take-off, landing, and flying through turbulence doesn’t bother me now because I learned about a trauma from my past and with help was able to process it.

So why does that matter? We can so easily overlook our histories and focus on our kid’s stuff, but if we don’t do the work to come to terms with our own stuff, we will never fully be able to help our kids process their hurts and fears.

We recently flew to Orlando with our six children. My eight-year-old daughter sat next to me on the flight. She was very excited about going on vacation and on her first flight right until the moment she sat down. She grabbed my arm and she started sobbing when I buckled her seatbelt. I asked her why she was crying and she told me that she was scared and that she wasn’t sure if she wanted to go with us. So what did I do? I employed the only coping skills I knew; I got the oils from my wife, I put her headphones on her, cranked the music, and I told her to play Minecraft.

It startled her when we pushed back from the gate. As did the safety briefing, taxiing, and accelerating. As we took off she asked me if we were flying, and I smiled and told her to look out of the window. She did and with a smile on her face declared that we were flying. I responded with a smile on my face.

The flight was very smooth until about forty-five minutes before we landed. The pilot announced that the weather was clear at our destination, but that there was a storm between us and Orlando. He said that everybody needed to sit down and to buckle their seat belts and that the flight crew needed to do the same. My anxiety level spiked…for my daughter. Then we didn’t level off, we actually went nose down and accelerated and my little girl went “whee, it’s just like a roller coaster.”

I once sat across from a flight attendant who told me that she used to be afraid of flying. She said that she realized when she was 17-years-old that she wasn’t afraid of flying; her mother was and she thought that she was supposed to be afraid too. If I had not been able to work through my issue on airplanes, think about how my daughter would view flying. If when she was stressed and she looked at her dad, I was freaking out the same way, she would hate flying.

Always be willing to do the work necessary to process your past because if you’re not willing to do the work, sometimes the hard work of coming to terms with your story, you will never be able to help your kids the way they need.

“You cannot lead a child to a place of healing if you do not know the way yourself.” – Dr. Karyn Purvis

Rest

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There are many things about our American lifestyle that people from other nations find peculiar. They look at our habits and rituals and don’t understand why we do some of the things we do. One of those things that others are puzzled by is our culture of busyness. We are always going and doing. Being busy is some kind of badge of honor for most of us.

Our culture of busyness has reached epidemic proportions. We consume energy drinks and caffeinated drinks to get us going, some people even take pills (over the counter and others) to help them go, go, go. And then at the end of the day, they take other over the counter pills, prescription drugs, or natural supplements to help them sleep, just to run another cycle after too little sleep. We are tired and we are stressed and we are not able to give our best to our spouses and our kids.

The problem with constantly being busy is that we can’t be present with our families if our attention and best is constantly given elsewhere.

Something has got to change. We all need to take a break. There is a lie we are too quick to believe, if not me then who? If I don’t do it, it won’t get done. We need to follow God’s example of resting from his work.

The bible says that rested from all of his work on the seventh day of creation. It’s interesting that most people don’t see rest as part of the created order, yet the bible says that God rested from his work on the seventh day of creation. May we follow the Lord’s example and rest, really rest, from our labors and enjoy some time with family and friends.

Prayer
Lord, help me to be like you and rest. I want to be less busy and be more present with my family. Let me push the distractions aside and help me be the husband and father they need me to be. In Jesus name, Amen

“On the seventh day God had finished his work of creation, so he rested from all his work.” – Genesis 2:2 (NLT)

Holy Bible. New Living Translation copyright© 1996, 2004, 2007, 2013 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

2016 Tapestry Adoption and Foster Care Conference

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The 2016 Tapestry Adoption & Foster Care Conference will be held October 21 & 22 at Irving Bible Church. Last year we went BACK TO BASICS, this year we decided to go BEYOND THE BASICS. We will feature TBRI trained professionals, Empowered to Connect Parent Trainers, Dr. Mandy Howard, and Dr. David Cross, co-author of The Connected Child.

We will offer three workshops on Friday, October 21, for families, professionals, and ministry leaders. The conference on Saturday, October 22, will consist of 12 breakout sessions, one lunch session, and two general sessions (AM and PM).

Detailed information regarding speakers, sessions, and workshops, as well as registration, can be found at tapestryconference.org. Please email us at tapestry@irvingbible.org if you have any questions. We look forward to seeing you in October.